Ground Line Teams, Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion

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Ground Line Teams, Camp Wood, New Jersey,February 8, 1944:

Back row:

2nd from the right: Wilbert H. Hansen.

3rd from the right: Warren J. Martin.

Others in the photo: John G. Artie, Samuel Goodman, George H. Kiester, Albert L. Lewis, Bert Markowitz, Floyd C. Milhouse, George R. Miller, Andrew W. Morvay, Loring Pingley, Harold Powell, Harold E. Quinley, John B. Rada, Jr., Laurence M. Slack, Harold K. Sullivan, Rich W. Wang.


The son of Warren J. Martin shared this photo of his father in the Ground Line Team of Company C, 3110th Signal Service Battalion.

Wilbert H. Hansen is in the photo. His sons have contributed photos and information about their father’s service in Company C.

Company C was the battalion’s Open Wire Repair Section with pole and wire responsibilities including construction and maintenance.

All members of the Ground Line Teams are listed on the roster attached to the Company’s July 14, 1944 Morning Report.

That documents that they were in the company when it deployed to Normandy and served in Tamerville and Valognes in July and August, 1944.


Links, sources, and more information:

3110th Signal Service Battalion INDEX: Includes links to details of the 2014 honoring of the 3110th in Tamerville.

Company C Ground Line Teams: Includes links to the July 14, 1944 Company Morning Report with roster.


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5ZvuU-2N

Felix A. Cizewski and the 1945 First Anniversary of D-Day

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CLICK ON IMAGE for link to full 8 pages.

First Anniversary of D-Day. The Stars and Stripes Magazine, Vol. V, No. 1, June 3, 1945.

(Public Domain Image.)


70 years ago today, my late father, Felix A. Cizewski, was in the 45th Signal Company, 45th Infantry Division on occupation duty near Munich, Germany

There he obtained a copy of the June 3, 1945 1st anniversary of D-Day commemorative issue of Stars and Stripes Magazine.

He kept his copy which I found after his death in 2004.

All eight pages have been posted on my family history website.

Felix’s copy has been donated to the Illinois Holocaust and Education Center in Skokie.


Links, sources, and more information:

Felix A. Cizewski and Occupation Duty


This is a revision of the June 6, 2010 post the 65th anniversary of the of the 1945 First Anniversary of D-Day from the Cizewski, Lovetere, Musbach, & Robinson Families blog.

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5ZvuU-2E

Felix A. Cizewski and the 70th Anniversary of 45th Division’s Memorial Day Observance in Munich

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The 45th Division in the Konigsplatz.

My late father Felix A. Cizewski and the 45th Signal Company are somewhere in this photo. 

Public domain image.


After liberating Dachau, the combat units of the 45th Infantry Division captured Munich on April 30, 1945.

Felix A. Cizewski, my late father, and the 45th Signal Company arrived on May 1st.

The 45th Division remained in and around Munich on occupation duty.

One month later on May 30, 1945, all the units of the 45th Infantry Division held Memorial Day services in the Konigsplatz, Munich, Germany.


WATCH the first 41 seconds of this German news reel.

That clip is of the 45th’s Memorial Day service in the Konigsplatz. The unit is not identified.


1tVIEW the four page program of the 45th Infantry Division Memorial Day Services May 30, 1945 in the Konigsplatz, Munich, Germany.


More photos from the services:

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120th Medical Battalion, 45th Infantry Division.

Photo by the late Robert N. Szwed of the 45th. Photo shared by his son Chris.

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Robert N. Szwed at the services.

Photo shared by his son Chris.


Links, sources, and more information:

Felix A. Cizewski and the Central Europe Campaign


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5ZvuU-28

Hard to Find WWII Non-Signal Corps Unit Information: New Feature of the Unofficial Archive of the Signal Corps in NW Europe in WWII

While researching my late father’s WWII service in the U.S. Army Signal Corps and assisting other families, I have come across information about non-Signal Corps units that is hard to find or not readily accessible.

To assist other families, I am uploading that information to a new section of the Unofficial Archive of the Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII.

Non-Signal Corps Units

The first item is the History & Operations of the Eighty First Field Artillery Battalion, 8 June 1940 to 7 May 1945.


cover

Cover of the History & Operations of the Eighty First Field Artillery Battalion, 8 June 1940 to 7 May 1945.

Public domain image


I responded to a request for help from Ursula Liphardt from Germany. Ursula was researching her husband’s late father, her father-in-law Vincent Scott. Vincent served in the 81st while on occupation duty in Germany.

Among the items Ursula wished to research was Scott’s unit history.

A history of the 81st was published in Erfurt, Germany in 1945.

Copies could not be found in German libraries or archives.

In the United States, copies were available from booksellers for about $100 or from a few libraries.

The Madison Public Library requested an interlibrary loan of the University of Illinois’s copy.

While we were waiting for it someone found and shared a PDF copy with Ursula.

I will suggest that the University of Illinois library (my alma mater) add this PDF to their digital collection to make it even more readily available.


My new Non-Signal Corp Units information section to is dedicated to my family history friend Ursula.


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5ZvuU-1Z

Felix A. Cizewski and the 70th Anniversary of the End of the War in Europe

Felix A. Cizewski’s copy of the 45th Division News Extra edition, May 13, 1945, announcing the end of the war in Europe.

Click on image for a larger version and link to page two.

Image in the public domain. The original has been donated to the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center.

70 years ago at the end of April, 1945, the Nazis had been defeated in the 45th Infantry Division’s area of operations. The 45th then halted in and around Munich and Dachau.

A few days later on May 8 the war in Europe ended with the surrender of the Nazis.

As positive as this was, Felix did not yet know his fate.

At that time he had no indication that he was going home.

He could remain in Germany on occupation duty or be transferred to the Pacific for the war with Japan.


Links, sources, and more information:

Felix A. Cizewski and the Central Europe Campaign

45th Division News: Dachau liberation and end of the war in Europe editions from Felix A. Cizewski’s collection.

Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center


This is a revision of a post from Cizewski, Lovetere, Musbach, & Robinson Families blog on May 9, 2010 for the 65th anniversary of the end of the war in Europe.

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5ZvuU-1J


Felix A. Cizewski and the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Dachau

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Felix A. Cizewski’s copy of the Dachau Liberation Edition 45th Division News, pages 1 & 3.

Click on image for more larger edition.

Public domain images from originals donated to the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center.

Seventy years ago, on April 29, 1945 after a battle with the SS guards “Task Force Sparks” liberated Dachau.

”Task Force Sparks” consisted of elements of “I” and “L” Companies, 3rd Battalion, 157th Infantry Regiment, 45th Division supported by elements of the 191st Tank Battalion.


While the combat units were liberating Dachau, my late father, Felix A. Cizewski, was in the 45th Signal Company on the road from Schrobenhausen about 39 miles (63 kilometers) by road north of Dachau to Haimhausen, about 8 miles (13 kilometers) northeast of Dachau.

Every member of the 45th Division at that time including Felix officially share the recognition as liberators by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the U. S. Army Center of Military History.

Felix would want to be very clear that his and the other members of of the 45th Signal Company role in the liberation of  Dachau was providing communications support for the front line combat troops.

The combat troops would add that they appreciated the support from troops such as my father. One shared that it was the luck of the draw as to who ended up in the combat units and who was assigned to support units such as my father.


“Immediately after Dachau’s liberation, U.S. Army authorities and other Allied representatives began treating the sick prisoners, implementing health and sanitary measures to curb the typhus epidemic, and bringing in tons of food to feed the starving prisoners. The local townspeople were brought in to give the dead prisoners a proper burial.”

– From United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Holocaust Encyclopedia’s entry The 45th Infantry Division

On April 30, the day after liberation, the 45th Signal Company arrived at Feldmoching, Germany on the northwest edge of Munich, less than 8 miles southeast of Dachau.

The 45th Division was stationed on occupation duty in Munich area near Dachau from May until late July, 1945. The 45th Signal Company and the 45th Division would have been able to assist in the care of the liberated survivors.

As Felix was bi-lingual English-Polish, he may have been called upon to assist in the care for the about 8,900 Polish speaking survivors.


My late father never spoke of his experiences at Dachau.

Dad was a very private and shy man. He said little about his service and nothing about Dachau.

Dad would be both a bit embarrassed while quietly proud of my sharing of his service.

The liberation of Dachau may have been one of the most powerful and traumatic experiences of my father’s life.

Because of that for the rest of his life Felix may have suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.


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Felix A. Cizewski’s photo of the entrance to the SS training camp and garrison for Waffen-SS soldiers, located west of the prison compound. It was about five times larger than the concentration camp.

Click on image for more larger edition information

Felix wrote on the back:”Dachau Germany Prison Camp”. This is from his collection but not one of the photos he took.

The original has been donated to the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center.

Watermarks on images

Several years ago an image of the 45th Division News from my family history site was copied and posted on a Nazi sympathizing, Holocaust denying site.

As the 45th Division News is in the public domain, I have no control of its use.

Adding watermarks to images I post may discourage their misuse. Nazi sympathizers and Holocaust deniers may be reluctant to use images with a 45th Division Thunderbird watermark.


Links, sources, and more information:

Felix A. Cizewski and Dachau: Includes links to larger images of the Dachau liberation edition of the 45th Division News.

Felix A. Cizewski: An Unrecognized and Uncompensated Disabled Veteran?

Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center

Virginia Holocaust Museum

Assessing Atrocity


Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5ZvuU-17
Revised:

FBI Director Erroneously Calls Poland A “Holocaust Accomplice”

On April 15, 2015, FBI director James B. Comey delivered a speech at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s 2015 National Tribute Dinner entitled “Why I require FBI agents to visit the Holocaust Museum”.

While he accurately cited Nazi allied Hungary as Holocaust accomplice, he erroneously included Poland an accomplice.

In response to Director Comey’s error the American ambassador to Poland was summoned for a meeting with the Polish Foreign Ministry and the Polish ambassador to the U.S. has asked for an apology.

I suggest that Director Comey join his agents on their training visits the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and spend time in the library to develop an accurate knowledge of the Holocaust.

Director Comey would then learn that rather than being an accomplice, Poland was the major victim of the Holocaust.


Among the reasons that  Director Comey’s error is so painful to Poland and Poles is Poland will never fully recover from the damage done by the Holocaust.

Poland will never again be a Slavic-Jewish nation.

Prior to the Holocaust, the population of Poland was about 10% Jewish and Poland was the world center of Jewish life, learning, language, culture, literature, religion, and politics.

Almost the entire Polish Jewish population of about 3 million was exterminated. After the war, the Soviet occupiers and their Polish Communist puppet government failed to provide security for the returning survivors so most fled.

Almost 3 million other Poles were also killed, many as part of a concurrent Nazi extermination campaign against Slavs.

Almost six million Poles of all ethnicities and religions were killed by the Nazis.


Director Comey’s error is a Cold War remnant of the Soviet Union’s successful anti-Polish propaganda campaigns. The Soviet allied Communist Party USA and their supporters and sympathizers embedded that false Polish history in popular culture and public consciousness.

Among the goals of that campaign was to divert attention from the Soviet Union’s major responsibility for the Holocaust as a Nazi ally for about the first two years of WWII.

That Soviet complicity is rarely mentioned while erroneous statements about Poland are almost routine are a lingering effect of that very successful propaganda campaign.

Repeating that error continues the pain of ½ century of Soviet oppression of Poland.


In previous posts I have detailed both the Soviet’s and Hungarian’s complicity in the Holocust:

SOVIET UNION

HUNGARY


Holocaust History and the Unofficial Archive of the Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII

I occasionally post about Holocaust history on the Unofficial Archive of the Signal Corps in Northwest Europe in WWII blog to honor the members of the Signal Corps who provided direct communications support for the liberation of some of the Nazi concentration camps.

Among them was my late father Felix A. Cizewski who served in 45th Signal Company which provided support to the 45th Infantry Division’s combat units who liberated Dachau.

After liberation he was stationed near Dachau for about 2½ months on occupation duty. He may have shared in the care of the liberated survivors. He was fluent in Polish and  almost 9,000 Polish speakers were among the liberated survivors.


Links, sources, and more information:

Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center

Virginia Holocaust Museum

Assessing Atrocity


Revised: April 21, 2015

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p2ix3W-mw